The Council Has Spoken: May 27, 2016

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Council Submissions: May 25, 2016

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A Coming Out Post

I’m sorry for saying all this by blog post but I think this is the best way and gives us time to think about it. I can assure you that I’ve thought long and hard about this decision and do not make it lightly. I realize that I have been living a lie, and each time I laugh along with others or make fun of those like me, a little piece of me dies inside.

I am writing this post to tell you that I support Donald Trump. It’s something that I have suspected for months but have only managed to accept over the last week or so. Since New Hampshire I have always known that something was different. After Scott Walker dropped out I moved to Rand Paul, and after he quit I moved on to Ted Cruz. It has just taken me so long to realize because let’s face it, admitting one is going to vote for Trump isn’t popular, and there remain several good reasons not to.

I know this is not a phase and is who I am meant to be. I would have admitted it sooner but you would have been just as confused as I was. I wouldn’t have been able to answer any questions you would have because I wouldn’t know the answers myself. At least now you will be able to see I have accepted it and I am happy this way. It may go against expectations people have of me such as voting Libertarian or perhaps even making the switch to support the bitch (Hillary) as PJ O’Rourke and many other Republicans I respect have done, but in my heart I recognize that would be a terrible mistake. I ask myself, “Which candidate infringes on my liberty less?” and the answer is Trump. He is not perfect and I still hope that he turns out to be better than expected or perhaps Ronald Reagan himself returns and guides the party to victory in November, but barring those miracles I am left with accepting Trump and myself for what we are. And it’s clear that in the end he is a better choice when it comes to freedom than Hillary. After 8 years of Obama we cannot afford 4 years of Hillary and her lies. I just don’t think the Republic can take much more.

I have not told you and other people for this reason, but the older I get the more matters such as picking Supreme Court nominees and rolling back laws restricting our freedom start being mentioned and eventually you would have found out anyway. It’s just better sooner rather than later.

You may have noticed that whenever anybody dissed Trump to me I had absolutely no reaction to it or I would just look at the floor or act like I wasn’t listening. I know that a Republican White House is something I’ve wanted and attacking Trump instead of Hillary is something I am not willing to spend my life doing just so others can be happy. This is who I am and if they cannot accept that then the problem is with them, not me. I can try and help you (and everybody else) understand who I am, it will only work if they allow it.

I’m sorry for saying all this by a blog post but it’s the only way to be sure that I actually will tell you. Know that I respect you, kind reader, and that this does not change who I am. I hope that you can be happy and continue respecting my opinions. I’m still the same person I always was, and will continue to respect yours.

The Council Has Spoken: May 20, 2016

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Fourth place t with 2/3 votesIndyfromaz’s BlogStall Wars submitted by Puma By Design

Council Submissions: May 18, 2016

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On Dublin’s Rocky Road

Just got back from a week in Dublin. I have traveled to many places in this world but the only place outside of the USA that I’ve ever felt at home was Ireland. I’m sure racial memory has something to do with it (I’m quarter Irish) and being American helps since the Irish don’t hold it against us the way some of the Brits (“Iraq! Bush!”) and especially the French and Germans do. But their food is great, their coffee is hearty and black, and of course they’ve got the best beer in the world: Guinness, which I personally haven’t enjoyed in 15+ years but I’m sure St. Peter has one waiting for me, properly poured, at the Pearly Gates because if he doesn’t I’m sure the Other Guy will have one ready for me Down There.

Dublin is a great city with a hint of sadness. It’s fast becoming a multi-cultural European city and losing its “Irish” flavor. This is probably good for the economy and for the Irish people in the long-term, but in the short I’m not so sure. Ireland isn’t known for being a “melting-pot” and still struggles to integrate two very closely related ethnic groups with nearly identical religions. I’m not sure it’s ready to handle an influx of Middle Eastern Muslims, but ready or not they are there and more are coming. In Dublin there are large and apparently growing Eastern European communities. I visited St. Audoen’s Church and heard mass said in Polish. We were served by Czechs and Croats in several pubs and restaurants, and heard Russian several times spoken on the streets. Thanks to the EU’s immigration policy Ireland is opening up, but as an American I’m not sure filling low-skilled and low-paying jobs with Eastern Europeans is a solution to Ireland’s own employment troubles. It’s something that bears watching, and I would love to talk to the Irish more about this issue but since our stay was pretty much limited to Dublin our interactions with the Irish were more limited than previous trips outside of the city.

Talking to the Irish (two taxi drivers and one waitress) we were asked the same question, “So how about President Trump?” The question was posed that way not as a hypothetical, but as a reality. The three seemed convinced he was going to win the election. The Wife and I answered diplomatically, explaining that there was still a lot of time to go before the election and that much could still happen, but none of the three seemed worried. The Wife realized why. They had watched him on TV shows like The Apprentice and were comfortable with him. They knew more about him through those shows and the tabloid stories written about him over the past two decades than they do about Hillary Clinton, who never had the same level of public exposure as Trump. Granted they seemed bemused about him, kind of like, “You crazy Americans…” but they weren’t afraid of him nuking the Chinese or walling off Mexico the way the Hillary-leaning US press tries to scare Americans into fearing him.

We learned that the economy there is still down, but the impression is that things are turning the corner. One taxi driver said that it will be a long time before Ireland returns to being the Celtic Tiger, but remained guardedly optimistic about the country’s future. The impression that we had of Dublin was that the city had clearly seen better days, but the city had potential. Cellphone and broadband services are much better, faster and cheaper than what we are stuck with here. It was easy to get around the city on foot and using taxis, buses and trains. Real estate struck me as overpriced, but then again I’m living in one of the cheapest areas of one of the cheapest countries (real estate-wise) on the planet. And there is plenty to do. The arts are thriving in Dublin and we were bummed that we arrived between major dance performances. The museums are free and top-notch. And the city is filled with plenty of restaurants and pubs so that you never need to visit the same one twice unless you live there or want to.

As an American of Irish descent, I want to see Ireland succeed. I love Ireland and the Irish for many of the same reasons that I love Israel and the Jews. Both nations and peoples have suffered genocide* and oppression. Both have long colorful histories, and both have spawned brilliant scientists, entrepreneurs, and artists that have contributed to making the world a better place. Our next trip back is being planned (as is a trip to Israel coincidentally), and while Dublin’s road to the future remains rocky, I’m confident that the future is brighter than the typical Irish overcast sky.


——*I understand that equating the Holocaust with any other act of genocide in history is dangerous. What the Jews suffered in Europe under the Nazis was unique. No genocide was as carefully planned and executed as the Holocaust – and I respect that. But while differing in scale, the Irish suffered genocide and ethnic cleansing at the hands of the British. I am descended from a husband and wife who came to the US to escape starvation caused by a natural event exacerbated by British policies and used as a tool for the ethnic cleansing of the Irish from their homeland. This was the culmination of several hundred years of oppression that wouldn’t end until the Irish gained independence in 1922. I am not sure how many of my Irish family starved to death during Black 47, but I doubt the number was zero.

And while I remain an Anglophile, I hope that no Brit ever asks me about my guilt over slavery as an American because I’ll have to “let fly” my shillelagh to remind them about their own nation’s sordid past.

The Council Has Spoken: May 13, 2016

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Council Submissions: May 11, 2016

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The Council Has Spoken: May 6, 2016

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Second place t with 2 votes National ReviewSomething New Under The Political Sun submitted by Stately McDaniel Manor and The Noisy Room

Second place t with 2 votes Thomas Lifeson/American ThinkerIt’s Trump. Get over it submitted by The Watcher

 

Council Submissions: May 4, 2016

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No Bueno

If Mexico is so great just head south kid.

The Council Has Spoken: April 28, 2016

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Council Submissions: April 27, 2016

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The Council Has Spoken: April 22, 2016

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Council Submissions: April 20, 2016

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